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20121201
20121231
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CSPAN 15
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English 26
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the chair. signed: patrick j. leahy, president pro tempore. mr. reid: madam president? the presiding officer: the majority leader. mr. reid: following leader remarks, the senate will be in a period of morning business for an hour. republicans will control the first half, the majority the second half. following morning business, we'll resume consideration of the supplemental appropriation bill. i mentioned last night, madam president, that we're going to have to move forward on this bill. i have been told that the republicans want to have a substitute, and we look forward to whatever that might be, that we can set up a series of votes to satisfy those people who want to change this bill in some manner. i would just note that the people in the northeast, other states but principally new york and new jersey, there are 700,000 people who have lost their homes and are still -- tens of thousands of those homes have been destroyed. other people are still living in very, very difficult situations. when we had this devastation we had in new orleans, we got the aid to those states very quickly. the po
the balance of his time. the gentleman from michigan. mr. rogers: thank you, madam speaker. as many things keep me awake at night as the chairman of the house permanent select committee on intelligence, the growing threat from chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear attacks not only abroad but here is of growing concern, instability in governments that possess these materials and increasing interest from those who would choose to do harm to the united states, desire to get their hands on these materials, means that we must prepare ourselves here at home for the unfortunate, i think unlikely, certainly in the short-term but possible position of being attacked with these disturbing weapons systems. this is that important step to protect americans by increasing our stockpiles and would urge its passage and with that, madam speaker, i yield back the balance of my time. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the question is will the house pass the bill. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of the chair, 2/3 of those voting havi
. gentleman from texas. mr. burgess: thank you, madam speaker. i yield myself one minute. i would point out that the f.d.a. has not retracted the use for the short-term use of a rescue inhaler in the treatment of acute asthmatic attacks. that just simply has not happened. to say that congress is now seeking to overrule the f.d.a. is just simply preposterous because that is not the facts on the table right now. regulatory earmark, come on. give me a break. i would welcome another companies into the marketplace that wanted to create a low cost, effective, convenient treatment for asthmatics who need an acute respiratory relief when there is meds, that they take on a chronic basis either are not working or for whatever reason a flareup has occurred. i'm an asthma patient. i'm on asthma medicine. in the product information provided to patients, on the long-term medicine, a statement this is not intended as an acute -- rescue device for an acute attack. for that you need something that was previously available over the counter. there's no reason for congress to tell patients -- i was astounded b
from the senate. the secretary: mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: madam secretary. the secretary: i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the senate has agreed to s. res. 624, relative to the death of the honorable daniel k. inouye, senator from the state of ohio. -- hawaii. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and the minority whip each, to five minutes but in no event shall debate continue beyond 11:50 a.m. the chair recognizes the gentleman from oregon, mr. blumenauer, for five minutes. mr. blumenauer: thank you, mr. speaker. the reality behind the fiscal cliff is that if we really get down to work, talking with one another, digging into the details, it really is not that hard. the nuclear arsenal is a prime example and something that doesn't get
will receive a message. the messenger: madam speaker, a message from the senate. the secretary: madam speaker. i have been directed by the house -- sflat that the house that the senate has passed a bill in which the concurrence of the house is requested. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and the minority whip limited to five minutes each, but in no event shall debate continue beyond 11:50 a.m. the chair recognizes the gentleman from texas, mr. poe, for five minutes. mr. poe: madam speaker, there is nothing more americana than the image of happy children at school during the christmas season. that week that norman rockwell picture was stolen. here are 23 of the 26 victims that were murdered that day. we should know their photographs. we should know their names. they were chase k
attention. madam chair and colleagues, i think you've concluded your draft of water resources bill in which i appreciate and i hope we can address that later this year. unfortunately, other areas where this will protect it and saw. this first photo -- this is a new bridge over the indian river inland. you can ask the atlantic ocean to the delaware. that's a new bridge could be spent over $200 million on the bridge in the last several years. a lot of federal money, quite a bit of state. this is the old bridge. it disappeared. it's gone. this is a highway to the old bridge. ron. four months ago people make their way up and down the east coast. today the bridge is completely gone along with highway approaches. the new bridge are threatened and we want to make sure we've made a $200 million investment that we don't use the bridge. until the bridge can work underwater. unfortunately you can't get to the bridge and the beaches of rio to the easter pÂtÉ densities to be there argonne and they need to be replaced. thank you. in addition, a huge breach fewell -- with the delaware bay and delaware r
? i yield the floor, senator leahy. mr. leahy: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from vermont. mr. leahy: madam president, what is the parliament situation? the presiding officer: the senate is in a period of morning business. mr. leahy: i thank the distinguished presiding officer. i assume then that we're going back and forth? the presiding officer: the senator from louisiana. ms. landrieu: madam president, i would be happy to accommodate other senators, but i came to the floor to speak for about ten minutes on the supplemental. i see senator mccain. i don't know if he came to speak on senator inouye or the supplemental. senator merkley and senator stabenow want to offer an amendment or introduce an amendment. is that appropriate? the presiding officer: the senator is correct. that is appropriate. the senator from arizona. mr. mccain: i would request we do as usual in morning business, back and forth, if that's all right. if i could follow the senator from louisiana? the presiding officer: without objection. ms. landrieu: and if the senator would yield, the senat
. altmire: thank you, madam speaker. i appreciate it. i will not speak for nearly 60 minutes. i'm tempted to engage the gentleman, my good friend, mr. woodall, in debate, but i won't do that because i know he's still smarting from his bulldog's loss over the weekend and i'm going to let him continue to think about that. i very much enjoy the friendship and camaraderie with mr. woodall, we do have a difference of opinion on some of those issues. before i start, madam speaker, i would say to the group, the individual who will be speaking following my presentation, that i plan to only speak for about five minutes. or less. so this will not be an hour-long presentation. so the speaker who will follow me on the majority side i would recommend they hang near the floor because i will be wrapping up shortly. madam speaker, i rise to commemorate the 50th anniversary of laroche college. founded in 1963 by the sisters of divine providence in mccandliss, pennsylvania, a suburb of pittsburgh, it was named in honor of ma reap laroche, the first superior of the congregation of the sister of divine provi
. madam president, it's been difficult to envision the day when i would be saying farewell to the senate. just as it was impossible to imagine i would one day become the united states senate rss is growing at a name. but such is the miracle of america that a young girl of a greek immigrant in first-generation american could in time be elected to serve in the greatest delivered his body the world has ever known and become the third longest-serving woman in the history of the united states congress. and so, in contemplating how to begin my remarks today, first minute of the words of the renowned poet, ralph waldo alarcon, who said cultivated the habit of being grateful for every good thing that comes to you and to give thanks continuously. and because all things have contributed to your advantage, you should include all things in your gratitude. that perfectly encapsulates how i am feeling on this day, madam president, thankful and blessed. and in that light, i first and foremost want to thank the people of maine for allowing me to be her voice, their vote and their champion for 16 years i
, and so forth and for other purposes. mr. leahy: madam president? the presiding officer: the senator from vermont. mr. leahy: mr. president, on behalf of senator inouye, the chair would send -- the clerk has reported the bill; is that correct? the presiding officer: the senator is correct. mr. leahy: you have a substitute amendment which is at the desk. the presiding officer: the clerk will report the amendment. the clerk: the senator from vermont, mr. leahy, for mr. mr. mr. inouye proposes amendment 3338. mr. leahy: on behalf of mr. inouye, i have an amendment to the substitute which is at the desk. the presiding officer: without objection, the clerk will report. the clerk: the senator from vermont, mr. leahy, for mr. inouye, proposes an amendment, number 3339. mr. leahy: mr. president, i'm going to speak briefly on this in just a moment. in the meantime, i will suggest the absence of a quorum, but i will call it off very quickly. i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: the presiding officer: the senator from vermont. mr. leahy
a question. i do maim madam chairman have questions i would like to submit to the secretary and directer fugate. i don't want to take my time here. with your permission, i'll submit the question and you can get the answers back to us. i want to focus now on not just fundings needing for recovery porks -- portions of the recovery, but i think there's a common theme throughout the morning's testimony by the various senators. it is that how do beget beyond just basic of recovery. to and restoration to really the mitigations aspects? and kind of challenge that we're looking there relative to this what turn out to be an inextraordinary cause when you look at the map that was presented here in terms of the extent of this storm, the population that lives within that red zone, and purple zone, and the density of construction businesses and et. cetera, et. cetera, et. cetera. we're talking about an enormous amount of money and mitigation that would be necessary to bring us to the so-called 21st century protection from what appears to be ever increasingly the devastating storms. we are not talking
and eyes on the ground and personal experience. >> thank you madame chair and to the witnesses. i have three points. briefly. to express my real sympathy for the support of all victims of sandy might be not homes, businesses and livelihood. and has said tragic human face and we need to keep that in mind. i am supportive of acting quickly of aid to immediately help those victims. we need to do that in a thoughtful, responsive, resp onsible way with the mayor can taxpayer in mind. second govett with the sba, there is good news and room for continuing improvement. we have come along way positively since hurricane katrina and rita and your response has been significantly improved. the initial response 2005 was low, and adequate to before steve preston took over and turned to the disaster program around and it has improved. we could work in this committee to enact further improvements and reform that senator landrieu mentioned. i was proud to work with her and others including the sba disaster reform 2008 farm bill. but we can continue to learn and to improve and enact reform and we can in
in this situation. senator vitter? >> thanks, madame chair. i want to make three points briefly. first of all, again, i want to express my real sympathy for all the victims of sandy. this was a horrible, devastating disaster, wiping out homes, businesses, and livelihoods and it has a tragic human face and we need to keep that in mind. i'm certainly supportive of acting quickly in terms of help and aid that is going to directly, immediately help those victims. we also need to do that in a thoughtful and responsive -- responsible way with the american taxpayer in mind we can do both of those things. so i certainly support that. secondly on the s.p.a. side i think there is good news and there is room for counting improvement. the good news i do think we've come a long way, positively since katrina and rita. and the s.p.a. disaster response has been improved. the response in 2005 was slow an inadequate before steven preston took over and turned the program around and it has improved since then. were able to work on this committee in a bipartisan to write and enact further reforms that the senator mentio
? >> thanks, madame chair. i want to make three points briefly. first of all, again, i want to express my real sympathy for all the victims of sandy. this was a horrible, devastating disaster, wiping out homes, businesses, and livelihoods and it has a tragic human face and we need to keep that in mind. i'm certainly supportive of acting quickly in terms of help and aid that is going to directly, immediately help those victims. we also need to do that in a thoughtful and responsive -- responsible way with the american taxpayer in mind we can do both of those things. so i certainly support that. secondly on the s.p.a. side i think there is good news and there is room for counting improvement. the good news i do think we've come a long way, positively since katrina and rita. and the s.p.a. disaster response has been improved. the response in 2005 was slow an inadequate before steven preston took over and turned the program around and it has improved since then. we were able to work on this committee in a bipartisan to write and enact further reforms that the senator mentioned. i was proud to work
. any questions? >> madam leader, you talked about comprehensive tax reform -- >> i said katrina, not sandy. i was still thinking of katrina. we have to address the needs. and if i just may say that, thank you, whoever just put that there. was that you? we had to do this before, where we had an impasse with a disagreement with the executive branch and the legislative branch. at that time, it was katrina. but the important message every day that we didn't pass something for katrina really caused great apprehension in that region and with individuals living there. and it is the same thing with sandy. where is the confidence they will get if they see we want this little bit now, and maybe this little bit now, and you can't spend that now? no, it's not about only what can you spend now; it's what you can plan on now. so, the timing is really important for sandy, as well, as it was when we had a similar impact because of the iraq war that people were concerned would hold up the katrina funding. yes, ma'am? >> speaker boehner said there's no point in raising tax rates for the top two p
. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. coburn: and i believe i'm through, madam chairman, and i would make the following point. ms. mikulski: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from maryland. ms. mikulski: again i want to thank the gentleman from oklahoma for offering all of his amendments. i would like to comment on coburn 3370, division 1 on the tax cheats. i certainly want to compliment him on that amendment. every single senator wants to prevent tax cheating, tax cheaters from receiving any funding in this bill. i'm for all of these prohibitions on tax cheats. i carry a similar provision in my usual and customary commerce-justice bill. the senator from oklahoma also is very sensitive about modifying it. his bill covers tax cheats and also dead people can't get federal funds. he modified it to cover funeral expenses. but we've also been told that this, by the finance committee that this amendment is not a blue-slip issue. i support the gentleman's amendment. and if it's agreeable with the gentleman from oklahoma on this side, we would like to take his amendment tonig
the fta still involved in that. we will save time and money because we do. >> finally, madam secretary, let me go back to a, you made -- comment you made about having the resources necessary to understand and rely upon so that a community or an individual or a business can make and inform -- make an informed decision, depending upon or relying upon that that decision will be funded at the end of the day. whether the consequences of not having the resources -- what are the consequences of not having the resources under which you would make those decisions? >> the recovery will take longer. as you wait longer, it becomes more expensive. that is why it is critical, and we have seen this time and again with our experiences in mississippi, louisiana, iowa, where, when communities understand the funding they have and are able to plan years down the line -- they take the data they have and are able to plan years down the line. that is critical to know what the resources are right up front. we're going to ask them to plan for recovery based on their unmet needs and based on the funding availab
. >> is there an objection to the original request? >> yes, i reject. -- i object. >> whiplash. >> madame president. >> what just transpired deserves a word. senator mcconnell came to the floor this morning and offered a change in law that would help us avoid the kind of obstruction and the kind of showdowns we have had in the past over the debt ceiling. in fact, the idea was not new. it was his original idea that has been the law of the land that followed. and he offered and challenged senator reid to bring this matter for consideration by the senate. he said he would bring this to a vote in 20 minutes. and we would decide up or down whether the debt ceiling problem would be resolved once and for all under senator mcconnell proposal. and then senator mcconnell objected, say, no, no, we need 60 votes. for those who do not follow the senate, 60 votes is equivalent to a filibuster vote. so this may be a moment in senate history when a senator made a proposal, and when given a opportunity for a vote, he filibustered his own proposal. i think we have reached a new spot in the history of the senate we have never
address that. senator mikulski. >> thank you, madam chair. >> if your not careful coming will have a mikulski and that is worse. trust me. you'd be happy to have one. >> am i not right, senator murray? >> that can be my next one. really, i want to they and you and the ranking member. this has been a great hearing. what you bring his experience in this area as the senator from louisiana and there is a great sense of compassion and also reform. we have a big job but if we could work together, we could institute reforms, responds in a very creative, compassionate way and keep an eye on the bottom line. i think that is what the people in the country and those affected would want us to do. right now, there is heartbreak in maryland. what i do want to comment on quickly are some of the things that are working. we do want to thank the president for quickly issuing the declaration of a general disaster -- a general disaster declaration. we thank secretary napolitano. i speak to her availability. fema, you have been on the job. we really want to thank you for that. the problem is the indivi
consideration. the speaker pro tempore: without objection. mr. chaffetz: thank you, madam speaker. mr. speaker, senate bill 1379 would grant the district of columbia courts and public defender service greater administrative flexibility in several areas. first, it authorizes the d.c. superior court of the court of appeals to hold additional conferences either annually or biannually, eliminating the current amendment they always poll such conferences each and every year. it requires the magistrate judges to athepped these conferences. and delay judicial deadline in certain emergency situations such as a natural disaster. it also allows the d.c. courts to be reimbursed by the d.c. government for certain office expenses and it gives the d.c. public defender service authority to purchase liability i shurens for its attorneys and changes its term of family court judges from five years to three years. nearly identical legislation was approved unanimously by the house in the 111th congress. there is no expected cost associated with the legislation. i'd like to thank the senator for sponsoring this bil
starting in 2013. thank you, madam chair. >> thank you. i'm going to end with you saying how important is for congress to act or not on the supplemental and what are your people saying about the signal that may send to them. i know 60 billion is a significant number. in your experience, what you're seeing on the ground, what are your telling you about the importance of that recovery package click >> is extremely important both for local businesses and for a visit in. for the people impacted by this time in people staying with friends in other areas are right now making the decision if were going to go out of business. so it's extremely important and the sooner the better can be acted on so we can get this unmet need and get people back to living in their homes and keep their businesses so important for a local economy. >> mr. law and mr. king. >> as i mentioned, our state government is doing their part. philanthropic communities do their part. but i must make it the approval of the president's proposed package of aid to our region, were not going to recover. so it's critically importan
for the record, and thank you. >> thank you, administrator. madam secretary? >> good morning. chairman men endezz, members of the subcommittee, thank you for the opportunity to testify regarding recovery from superstorm sandy. in my roll as deputy assistant secretary for grant programs at h.u.d., i am responsible for the community development program, the cbdg, the cbdg is critical to helping communities recover from and rebuild after natural disasters. this morning i will discuss sandy's impact on housing and the work that h.u.d. has started and will continue through cdbg for long-term recovery. additional details on these points and on secretary donovan's role as head of the president's sandy recovery task force are provided in my break-in testimony. hurricane sandy and the nor'easter that followed have had massive and varied impacts along the atlantic coast from virginia to rhode island, especially hard hit were new york and new jersey, two of our nation's critical economic engines. one of the major effects of storms like sandy is damage to home and apartments and displacement of families and
york. mrs. gillibrand: thank you madam chairwoman for your leadership on this essential bill. i can't thank you enough for your tenacity and determination to meet the needs of so many affected families in our states. i also want to thank senator landrieu for her leadership to help craft this bill that way that has transparency and accountability and to learn from the mistakes of the past with hurricane katrina. she's worked overtime to make this bill a reality and i want to thank her. of course i want to thank my colleague, senator schumer for his extraordinary leadership. senator menendez and senator lautenberg on behalf of their state, it makes a huge difference. but i do want to start with senator mikulski went off in recognition to senator blumenthal. during the holidays, we often reflect on our blessings. we think about what is going well in our lives. we think -- we are very thankful for what's been given to us. and whether it's the health of our children, being if a safe, warm home, whether it's having a good job whether it's having a business that's profitable, whatever thos
: thank you very much, madam chair. ranking member. thank you, mr. speaker. why did i sort of smell smoke when i heard this debate? it's reminiscent of nero fiddling while rome burned. the american people are waiting for us to get the job dobe here, not to make a myriad of excuses about why stuff hasn't been done. you're bringing up a rule that says we should take -- have suspension authority. let's bring the middle income tax cut up under suspension. i believe and i am willing to take the chance that this house would give over 2/3 of a vote to middle income tax cuts. a tax cut which gives -- do i detect your smirk to mean you don't think republicans won't vote for middle income tax cuts? should i take it to mean you will continue to hold middle income tax cuts hosstanl, giving tax cuts to the wealthiest people in our country? the unfairness of it iappall, the fact that it increases the deficit is disgraceful. and that it does not change -- create jobs is a big mistake for us to make. what we are asking for in this rule is to say no to the previous question so that we can take up a rule t
the rest of the statement for the record. thank you. >> madam secretary. >> good morning, chairman menendez, thank you for the opportunity to testify regarding recovery from superstorm sandy. in my role as to the secretary of grant programs with hud i am responsible for the community development's block grant program, the disaster recovery grant and home program. the disaster recovery program is critical to helping communities recover from and rebuild after natural disasters like superstorm sandy. this morning i will discuss sandy's impact on housing and the work had has started and will continue for long term recovery in the region. additional details on these points on secretary donovan's role as head of the sandy recovery task force are provided in witness testimony. hurricane sandy and the nor'easter that followed had massive and very impact on the atlantic coast from virginia to rhode island. especially hard hit were new york and new jersey, two of the nation's critical economic engines. one of the major effects of storms like sandy is damage to homes and apartments and individuals, ex
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)